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Wednesday, November 30, 2022

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St. Andrew


Romans 10:9-18
Psalm 19:8-11
Matthew 4:18-22

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apostles of love

“Through all the earth their voice resounds, and to the ends of the world, their message.” —Psalm 19:5

Christians are living in love (Jn 15:9-10) with God Who is Love (1 Jn 4:8, 16). Impelled by love (2 Cor 5:14), we publicly “confess with [our] lips that Jesus is Lord” and Love (Rm 10:9). We are not ashamed of the Good News of God’s love, although it is crucified love (Rm 1:16). Love is to be expressed and shared — no matter what the consequences in a hateful world (see Prv 27:5). In God’s love, we are bound to overturn this culture of death and replace it with “a civilization of love,” as Pope St. Paul VI prophesied in 1970.

In love, let us be witnesses for Jesus (Acts 1:8) and make disciples of all nations (Mt 28:19). Let us speak boldly, freely, and openly of Christ’s love (see Eph 6:19-20). Let us be like St. Andrew, who immediately after becoming Jesus’ disciple invited his brother, Simon, to do the same (Jn 1:41). Let us be like St. Andrew, who proclaimed God’s love to the nations and was crucified in imitation of Jesus’ crucified love.

Our beginning and our end is Love. Our mission and our message is Love. Our life and our death is Love. Abide in Love; abide in God (1 Jn 4:16).

Prayer:  Father, may I “grasp fully, with all the holy ones, the breadth and length and height and depth of Christ’s love, and experience this love” (Eph 3:18-19).

Promise:  Jesus “called them, and immediately they abandoned boat and father to follow Him.” —Mt 4:22

Praise:  “One of the two who had followed Him after hearing John was Simon Peter’s brother Andrew. The first thing he did was seek out his brother Simon and tell him, ‘We have found the Messiah!’ ” (Jn 1:40-41)

Reference:  (For a related teaching on God’s Love, listen to, download or order our CD 8A-1 or DVD 8A on our website.)

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